Tomaž Šalamun

Tomaž Šalamun

GENRE
Poetry
AFFILIATION
Alumnus
TIME IN IOWA CITY
1971
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Audio

Marvin Bell, Rowena Torrevillas, James Galvin, Mark Levine, and Jorie Graham read the work of IWP participants, including Tomaž Salamun


Location
Prairie Lights Bookstore
15 South Dubuque Street, Iowa City Iowa

Poets Marvin Bell, Rowena Torrevillas, James Galvin, Mark Levine, and Jorie Graham read the work of IWP participants whose work has been published in previous issues of the Iowa Review.

Works Read: Marvin Bell reads the following poems: “It Happened There Was a Man Who Wanted to Be a Hunter” by Ai Qing. “Give Indonesia Back to Me” by Taufiq Ismail. “The Exercise” by Fernando Arbelaez.

Rowena Torrevillas reads the poem “Indian Summer” by Nicolae Breban.

James Galvin reads an excerpt from the short story “Tort’s Bitter Marriage” by Amos Tutuola.

Mark Levine reads the following poems: “Barbaric Poem” by Guillermo Sánchez. “Wound and Knife” by György Somlyó. “The Biographer” by Ágnes Gergely. “Last Passengers” by Sunil Gangopadhyay.

Jorie Graham reads the following poems: “To Have a Friend” by Tomaž Salamun, trans. by Robert Hass. “Souvenir of the Ancient World” by Carlos Drummond de Andrade, trans. by Mark Strand. “A Pity, We Were Such a Good Invention;” “We Did It;” “Rain on a Battlefield;” “Out of Three or Four in a Room” by Yehuda Amichai. “Foreign Domestic;” “A Lovely Finish” by Elizabeth Bishop.

David Hamilton reads “Understanding Poetry” by Stuart Friebert.

 

Place

Tomaž Šalamun at the Shambaugh House


Location
Shambaugh House
430 North Clinton Street

Home of the International Writing Program, the Shambaugh House hosted Tomaž Šalamun during his time in the residency as well as during his return for the 40th Anniversary of the IWP in 2007.


University of Iowa, The International Writing Program

Place

Tomaž Šalamun meets Anselm Hollo at Donnelly’s Pub


Location
Donnelly's Pub
110 E. College St.

Tomaž Šalamun recalls visiting Donnelly’s Pub and meeting his future translator, Anselm Hollo, completely by chance:

 

Maybe I should start with how Iowa is totally magical for me, and why. I was in Ljubljana. Primož Kožak, a playwright, was here, with the IWP, and then, he was also involved in helping to select the next Slovenian person to come. He very decently offered this position to his younger playwright peer, his competitor. He said “no.” Then to the best young fiction writer, and he said “no.” And when I was asked, I said “Yes, of course.” And it had to be done very quickly. Two days later, Michael Scammell —you might know his name — he was then a lecturer in Ljubljana, then he became responsible for writers in prison for the International PEN […] and he said: “If you go to America, you will for sure meet the Finnish poet Anselm Hollo and like his poetry. Anselm Hollo was in Finland—and Finland was too small for him; he went to Germany, married in Germany, then worked for his uncle who was friends of Jung’s, then came to England, then became an English poet, than BBC wanted to promote him to a much higher position, he didn’t like this … he escaped … and he must be somewhere in America.”

I flew to Iowa City (Cedar Rapids), we went to Mayflower, I signed the lease, I went downtown, I went to one bar—I don’t remember its name— and then I went to Donnelly’s, and in Donnelly’s there was an older person and some people around him, and they were laughing and they included me. I realized they were poets, and I said, “I’m a poet, and come from the IWP.” And then the older person said, “Let me drive you to Mayflower.” On the road he had a small accident, and, when he handed his driver’s license to the police officer, I realized that he was Anselm Hollo!

That is how Iowa started for me, and it didn’t stop. Every third year there is some strange connection!


Šalamun, Tomaž. “Paul Engle Memorial Reading, IWP 40th Anniversary, The University of Iowa, October 12, 2007.” Virtual Writing University Archive, Full Archive.

Audio

Tomaz Šalamun Q&A, IWP 40th anniversary


Location
Iowa Writers' Workshop (Dey House)
507 North Clinton Street, Iowa City, Iowa

Slovenian poet and Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor Šalamun (IWP ’71) answers questions from the audience, October 12, 2007.


Šalamun, Tomaž. “Paul Engle Memorial Reading, IWP 40th Anniversary, The University of Iowa, October 12, 2007.” Virtual Writing University Archive, Full Archive.

Audio

Tomaž Šalamun reads for the Paul Engle memorial reading, IWP 40th anniversary


Location
University of Iowa Main Library
125 West Washington St.

Slovenian poet and Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor Tomaž Šalamun (IWP ’71) delivers the Paul Engle Memorial Reading, October 12th, 2007 at Shambaugh Auditorium in the UI Main Library.


Šalamun, Tomaž. “Paul Engle Memorial Reading, IWP 40th Anniversary, The University of Iowa, October 12, 2007.” Virtual Writing University Archive, Full Archive.

Tomaž Šalamun was a participant in the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program in 1971. He has published 38 volumes of poems in his native Slovenia and has been translated into nearly two dozen languages. ‘The Turbines’ (Windhover Press, University of Iowa, 1973) and ‘Snow’ (Toothpaste Press, West Branch, IA, 1974) were the poet’s debut collection in English. His true national debut in the U.S. was Selected Poems of Tomaž Šalamun, edited and in large part translated by Charles Simic, brought out in 1988 as part of Ecco Press’s prestigious Modern European Poetry series.

 

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